Latest Stories

contactpic.jpg As many as 1,000 children and young people in Northamptonshire could be missing out on school due to bullying warned Sally Keeble at the start of anti-bullying week.

 

And she’s supporting a call to action by Northampton youth group Lowdown to stamp out bullying which affects almost half of all children at some stage during their school life.

You can sign up to the Lowdown petition here. The group has already been out collecting signatures on the petition in Northampton town centre.

“This is an issue that affects hundreds of children and young people across the County. It accounts for absenteeism at school, low achievement and self-esteem, and at worst, self harm,” warned Sally. “In Lowdown’s campaign young people are highlighting the seriousness of the problem, and calling for action to prevent it.

The Lowdown petition calls on the County Council to conduct research into the level of bullying at schools and colleges in the County, to identify and roll out best practice and to support a conference on bullying during the coming year.

Anti-bullying week co-ordinated by the Anti-bullying Alliance runs from November 17th to 21st.

National research shows that:

  • ·         46 per cent of children and young people are affected by bullying at some stage of their school life.
  • ·         25 per cent of children and young people worry about bullying.
  • ·         Bullying is the second biggest worry for children going up into secondary school.
  • ·         Those most likely to be bulled are:
    • o   Children with a learning disability – 56 per cent say they have been bullied.
    • o   Young people who are lesbian gay, bisexual or transgender – two thirds say they have experienced bullying.
    • o   Children with Asperger’s Syndrome – 90 per cent of parents of children with this syndrome say they have experienced bullying.

Children and young people who are bullied are three times more likely to self harm, and are also more likely to be absent from school. Nationally 77,950 children are out of school at any one time with bullying given as one of the reasons for absence – this would mean about 1,000 Northamptonshire children were out of school for this reason -  and of these nationally 16,000 are out of school with bullying being the main reason for absence.

Stamp out bullying which keeps up to 1,000 Northants children out of school

 As many as 1,000 children and young people in Northamptonshire could be missing out on school due to bullying warned Sally Keeble at the start of anti-bullying week.  

Local authorities in Northampton must put residents groups at the heart of the planning process to unlock the potential of our town.

Speaking at a conference on the town's future at the University of Northampton, Sally Keeble said that Northampton has some outstanding features - a beautiful river front, more parks than any town outside London, a sports hub in the west of the town. People in the town work hard and are committed to supporting their famlies and communities -  they should be at the heart of shaping the town's future.

Three things are needed, Sally told the Royal Town Planning Institute's meeting at Northampton University.

 - the biggest challenge is the need for vision and scale of ambition.  Where towns and cities have decided to transform themselves, they have done so to remarkable effect.

 -   Secondly we have to make sure we have the capacity to deliver. The 20th century new town corporation did some ambitious landscaping and planting, with the help of the local community, and then handed it over to the borough – which has spectacularly failed to manage the maintenance.

-   Thirdly.  if ever there was a lesson from the past mistakes it’s about the need to engage local communities – right from the start. It’s probably even more important now that political and governmental structures at every level are under such fire.Because it’s  not buildings that create vibrant towns and cities – it’s people. The buildings are, if you like, just the vehicles. Here in Northampton we have two stunning examples of what happens when you either don’t involve, or don’t listen, to what people have to say in planning your key buildings.

  One is the Bus station. The second is the train station – a very beautiful building, much needed, but with terrible access arrangements.

Residents group around the outskirts of the town have formed themselves into an effective forum to lobby against and over the plans for the new urban extensions. They have been well-organised and informed, consistent and impressive in following through the planning process. The White Hills and Spring Park group carried out an excellent traffic count to demonstrate the level of congestion and impact the new development proposed for their area.

Last week the Residents Forum met with the County’s transport officers and set out the need for a strategic transport plan that would cater for the new housing.  My challenge to the local authorities here is to work with those groups – make them partners in the planning process, and harness their energy and commitment to build new and sustainable  - and cohesive -  communities.  They have the ideas, expertise and drive – and the will to see new housing work in everyone’s best interests. They also know when something won’t work.  I believe that by working with them it may be possible to avoid some of the mistakes that have been made in the past, and unlock the potential of our town.

Call to put residents groups at heart of planning for new housing

Local authorities in Northampton must put residents groups at the heart of the planning process to unlock the potential of our town. Speaking at a conference on the town's future...

images_(3).jpgLong delays in getting GP appointments and A and E treatment were the biggest problems highlighted in the NHS survey. You can take part in the survey here and add your voice to the debate about the future of the NHS.

Responses included some glowing tributes to the NHS and to the dedicated NHS staff - along with a recognition that they are overworked.
Delays in getting appointments were the biggest problem identified - including some cases of delays in getting cancer treatment.
Here are some of the detailed responses:
  • Half of the people said they have to wait for more than two days for a GP's appointment, and a quarter have to wait between one and two weeks.
  • A third of the people who went to A and E said they had to wait between four and six hours for treatment.
  • A third of people had experienced a cancelled medical appointment - and one in ten had an operation cancelled.
  • Just over a third had been refused treatment on the NHS or had difficulty getting treatment. This included someone whose NHS podiatry had been abruptly discontinued.

The biggest problems people experienced was lack of continuity either at their GP practice or at hospital, seeing a different doctor each time, complaints about the shortage of mental health services, and - most worryingly  -  two people who reported delays in getting cancer treatment. The results will go into the Labour frontbench team.

If you want to take part in the survey, you can do so by clicking here. It's a short survey, will only take a few minutes, and will help the campaign for our NHS.

NHS survey highlights problems caused by treatment delays

Long delays in getting GP appointments and A and E treatment were the biggest problems highlighted in the NHS survey. You can take part in the survey here and add...

More Stories >

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.